Monday, March 9, 2015

Joel Elder Out at Tuthilltown


On Saturday, we reported on John Lunn's departure from George Dickel and Marianne Barnes leaving Brown-Forman. Now it's the turn of micro-distillery pioneer Tuthilltown, in New York, which is losing its chief distiller, Joel Elder.

Elder is leaving Tuthilltown to start his own craft distilling and progressive agriculture consultancy. He's calling it Quinta Essentia Alchemy.

Elder began in 2000 as an apprentice brewer at McCoy’s Public House in Kansas City, Missouri. He then went on what he calls “an agricultural apprenticeship journey” that led him to Tuthilltown. He has been chief distiller there for seven years.

9 comments:

Ralph Erenzo said...

Our best wishes and thanks to Joel Elder in his new venture.

Anonymous said...

Just curious why one would be considered a "chief distiller" at a small distillery and a "master distiller" at a large distillery ?

Chuck Cowdery said...

I don't decide what to call them, they do. I use the titles they use. Do you think I make this stuff up? If you want to know why Joel's title was 'Chief Distiller,' ask him or his former employers.

Anonymous said...

Are you aware that whenever the comments window is opened, you can't close it without confirming, not once, but twice, that you really want to close the window? This happens even if you just read the comments and don't add one.

That's totally amateur hour.

Chuck Cowdery said...

Nothing to do with me, except I choose to have Blogger (which is Google) host this blog. It does sound inconvenient. Nothing like that happens to be, but it may be a slightly different interface.

Alex said...

I have no problems with the comment box. Original poster, update your browser and revert to default settings, or install Google Chrome.

Mark Fleetwood said...

I have applied for trademark status of and protection of "I", "me", "you" and "they". I appreciate your respect of these trademarks.

Joel Elder said...

Hi Anonymous.

The purpose of the title comes from my discomfort at being called a "Master Distiller" in various print and online sources when I was just starting out. Mastery is a term of art that should be bestowed on one by one's peers, not simply because they hold a certain position. I would be honored to be called "Master" distiller" one day, but only if I were recognized as such by my peers and mentors.

"Chief" implies authority without implying mastery.

Ralph Erenzo said...

Well said Joel.